Comments on: Early Retirement http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/ The Intersection of Design & Motherhood Mon, 24 Nov 2014 01:59:06 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.1 By: Kiasa http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-460393 Kiasa Wed, 08 May 2013 08:02:12 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-460393 We are finishing up a 3 month “sabbatical” and have been traveling around the southeast USA. It’s been glorious and fun in so many ways. But also stressful and exhausting in other ways. We’ve considered doing this more long term and know what changes we would make. Perhaps we will continue. Our life is and open book right now and we are loving the story we are living

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By: Adrienne http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-460231 Adrienne Mon, 06 May 2013 23:58:06 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-460231 If you are not enjoying your life now as you work but will enjoy it once you retire I find that a sad state to be in. Its all perspective and there are three ways in which to see it: the way you see it , and the way I see it and the way it is. We have a choice in our perspective.
I do believe its our hearts desire to have a purpose in this life. When you find what your purpose is then you have meaning , fulfillment and a deep joy. That purpose can be through work or outside of work.

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By: {Weekend Reading} Save for a Rainy Day | Dee WilcoxDee Wilcox http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-460034 {Weekend Reading} Save for a Rainy Day | Dee WilcoxDee Wilcox Sun, 05 May 2013 02:38:00 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-460034 [...] This article about early retirement on Design Mom sparked a lot of strong opinions by readers, but I loved reading all the stories of folks who are living outside of the box. [...]

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By: Cheryl Burchett http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-460028 Cheryl Burchett Sun, 05 May 2013 01:35:53 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-460028 My sister went to work at a movie theater at 16 and by her early twenties worked her way up to their corporate offices. The complany got bought out and everyone got huge bonuses as their stock options were sold. She bought a big house for cash, but a few years ago she decided to simplify, sold the house, cut her expenses and retired! She didn’t have enough in savings to live like that for good, but enough to do nothing for a few years, then go to nursing school, and now she has a new career.

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By: Danielle http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459950 Danielle Sat, 04 May 2013 03:46:46 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459950 My husband and I took a mini retirement. I think for us, it became equally important to enjoy the now more than we were as to work very hard and save for later. We both have parents that have a very low quality of life due to health. In 2008 we sold our house, cars, and most all our furniture. We cashed in some of our retirement. We took a break for 10 months with our girls who were 7 and 10 and traveled. We came back decided to live a little smaller (only one car, no big house with a pool, etc.) and take more mini retirements. Other people often feel threatened that we have approached our life “different” than the norm but it really isn’t about us being better but just finding the path that made us happier and it doesn’t happen to be their path. We got quite a bit you must have won the lottery, but no we didn’t. We saved, we sold, we cashed in and we took on debt. Back in Dallas we no longer blog about it but we are doing a modified version of travel more work less.

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By: Stephanie http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459861 Stephanie Fri, 03 May 2013 19:03:22 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459861 Thank you for a new blog link~ I just clicked on it, I look forward to checking this out!

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By: Teresa http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459776 Teresa Fri, 03 May 2013 14:56:02 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459776 Let me know if you move back to the Denver area, I’ll be there. We bought a house in Ken Caryl (Littleton) so excited to move!

I’ll buy you coffee. :)

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By: Dee Wilcox http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459744 Dee Wilcox Fri, 03 May 2013 13:32:10 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459744 I think we struggle with the idea of someone doing their life so far off norm, whatever the norm might be. The one big question most people have about this kind of life style is economic — how do they support themselves? And there is a related assumption — that people choosing this lifestyle must not recognize the intrinsic value work.

It seems that most people who choose this lifestyle are not relying on friends and family to support their leisurely lifestyle. Many of them are using their savings, which means they paid the price ahead of time. And good for them! And it doesn’t seem to be that they don’t want to work — it’s more that they want time freedom, and a choice about where and how and when they spend their time. Many of them do work — they write, or create art, and many other things.

I fully support a lifestyle that bases its economic choices on how one can support one’s family and one’s dream. There is no need to work a nine to five for fifty years to support your family and take a vacation every summer if you can achieve the same goals some other way. Chris Guillebeau’s book “$100 Startup” is FULL of stories like this.

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By: Alistair http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459702 Alistair Fri, 03 May 2013 08:15:09 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459702 You do realize that many of these wonderful European programs so many here admire are completely unsustainable? America’s entitlement programs are headed toward insolvency too. A big part of this is the demographic crash that has taken place in much of the West. People having fewer children means fewer workers supporting each retiree. These systems were designed with higher birthrates and shorter lifespans in mind.

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By: Dee Dee http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459607 Dee Dee Fri, 03 May 2013 02:00:09 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459607 Hi, Amy,

Thanks for your interest. We receive a small stipend for teaching that covers our basics adequately. There are so many worthy organizations out there seeking individuals with varying experiences and educations. Seems we are always learn of some new opportunity. We remained in one location for seven years and then relocated two years ago – another country but still within East Asia. It’s not a life I would have imagined ten years ago, but it is really a good fit for us.

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By: Elliesee http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459382 Elliesee Thu, 02 May 2013 19:05:17 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459382 I just learned that in France a law allowed nurses with 3 children to retire after 15 years of work. Just imagine. That law was recently revoked. My colleague was able to retire when her son was 14 years since she had him later in life, it seemed like such a good idea to be there for her teen. I think we are facing a later retirement rather then sooner.

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By: Megan http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459362 Megan Thu, 02 May 2013 18:47:31 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459362 I am an avid follower of mrmoneymustache, a man who retired at 30 along with his wife so they could start their family. While they no longer have to work for a living, they do keep busy pursuing passions, some of which pay but many of which don’t.

Mrmoneymustache writes now about personal finance and how he achieved this early retirement on his blog. What I find most striking is for him and his family, retirement is not a period of inactivity or sloth or even wild luxury, but an opportunity for continual growth and improvement, free from the worry of money.

If anyone is curious about his story, he recently was interviewed: http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/meet-mr-money-mustache-the-man-who-retired-at-30/2013/04/26/71e3e6a8-acf3-11e2-a8b9-2a63d75b5459_story.html

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By: Becca Lloyd http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459309 Becca Lloyd Thu, 02 May 2013 16:32:42 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459309 I thought that when I quit my job to raise my first son that I was going into a very early retirement. Little did I know that I was just starting the hardest and most important work of my life!

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By: Summer http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459289 Summer Thu, 02 May 2013 14:17:48 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459289 I love this! I agree that women who choose a different path freak people out. I’m a personality that needs “structure,” so I need to work or I’d be a blob all day, but I’m content with what some would call a lackluster (albeit steady, and with decent income) career, I’ve never felt like I “had” to get married, and I don’t want kids. Funny story, my former (male) boss was asking me about myself and asked about kids. When I said I didn’t think they were for me, he was shocked – like, “Look me in the eyes and say that!” kind of shocked.

I have heard of “reverse retirement” where people work more later on than earlier. I do find the idea of working – or really doing anything – when i’m middle-aged horribly depressing. While taking a break from work isn’t in the cards for me, there are some things I do: I bought a red convertible at 25, bc I think it’s so sad when i see old women finally getting to cruise around in their cool car. I also travel quite a bit. Once on a flight to London, i sat next to this elderly couple (I’d say 80′s, but they were from nyc, so….maybe just 75. ;) ) , and I had to open their water bottles for them on the plane (much to the chagrin of the husband). Anyway, all I could think was, what business do they have shuffling around London? At that age, i just want to sit on the porch and drink lemonade. :)

Side note on the traveling: I can’t hear “I like that old time rock and roll” song without thinking of Mexico. I felt like so much was catered to the baby boomers, but there were just as many, if not more, Gen X/Gen Y vacationing.

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By: Kate http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459280 Kate Thu, 02 May 2013 13:16:12 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459280 I think it’s a great idea! To do the things you love, even if that includes dabbling in a bit of freelance work here and there, because you want to. If it were me I’d become a professional student, just studying whatever interests me! At the moment my husband works 26 weeks of the year, and still comes home every afternoon when he is working, so things are pretty sweet for now!

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By: Mary {My Life in Scotland} http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459266 Mary {My Life in Scotland} Thu, 02 May 2013 10:30:35 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459266 I wish!! Being expats in Scotland is an adventure in itself but it would be so nice if we had the money to retire and spend all this time together now…not later.

My best friend is throwing caution to the wind this fall. She’s been preparing for this for a long time but she’s quitting her job and travelling the world. She’s already been to 50 countries and she said she’d rather do that for her life than work for her corporate company. She is single and doesn’t have any children so I think it makes it easier. She’s written a book and is trying to sell it now. She hopes she’ll be able to write and travel for the remainder of her life. Sounds amazing to me!

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By: Mel http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459235 Mel Thu, 02 May 2013 04:41:11 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459235 My brother was able to retire at 47. He was an engineer in a big city. He sold his house and moved to a small town in North Dakota where all of our relatives are from. He was able to build a new house and buy a few acres of land – living expenses are much cheaper there. He is divorced and has no kids, so he was free to move wherever he wanted to. He volunteers at a local heritage center, does genealogy, and works for a farmer for several weeks in the spring and fall to supplement his income.

My dad was able to retire at 55 – sadly he died at age 61, so we were all glad he was able to retire early.

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By: Heidi http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459233 Heidi Thu, 02 May 2013 03:36:19 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459233 I have a problem with a life of leisure. What about giving back to society? If you spend at least some of your time giving back, then that’s great.

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By: Amy http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459223 Amy Thu, 02 May 2013 01:40:27 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459223 Gabrielle,

I HAVE given this a lot of thought. We had kids when we were older, so some of our contemporaries are retiring because they are taking buy-outs in their mid-to-late 50s. We can’t do that. Plus, I’m a fan of Suzi Orman, who advocates working as long and as hard as you can before retiring.

Also, I have closely observed our friends who did the early retirement thing (early/mid-40s). They were ecstatic the first couple of years. But they have to be extremely frugal, which is not the adventure it is when you are younger. Their job skills have stagnated so they would have to take much lower-level positions than they had if they could actually get a job, or they would have to start at the bottom of the ladder with a new career, their parents are aging in distant cities, their siblings are far away, etc. etc.

I realize some people have enough money to live well by quitting work early or, even, never working. But, realistically, it takes millions in the bank to retire in your early 30s (if you have a family that needs housing and education and soccer cleats and you want to retire well).

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By: Amy http://www.designmom.com/2013/05/early-retirement/comment-page-1/#comment-459222 Amy Thu, 02 May 2013 01:29:08 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=35005#comment-459222 Dee Dee,
Just curious, what do you live on if you volunteer and used up your savings?

Thanks,
Amy

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