Comments on: School Report http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/ The Intersection of Design & Motherhood Thu, 10 Apr 2014 07:14:56 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.1 By: Lola http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-303607 Lola Sun, 23 Oct 2011 22:51:20 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-303607 It’s much the same here in the UK – except no cheek-kissing and replace handball with rugby, cricket or netball (for the girls).

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By: Lexie http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-301948 Lexie Sun, 16 Oct 2011 06:02:55 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-301948 It sounds terribly similar to some of the schools I’ve been to here in Australia. And on a side note, I’m always gaping at the party photos I see online – so terribly elaborate and potentially expensive. I have so many lovely memories of my childhood birthday parties, and I wouldn’t change them for the world, but they were essentially very simple, low-key parties.

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By: barchbo http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-301164 barchbo Thu, 13 Oct 2011 15:18:35 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-301164 I don’t always get to comment, but as a teacher I LOVE reading about the kids’ school experiences. It’s so interesting!

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By: bdaiss http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300880 bdaiss Tue, 11 Oct 2011 16:20:43 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300880 Love the Ralph is an expert rapper via eminem.

Sounds like French kids have much better manners than many US kids. And I’m all for low fuss birthday parties. (She says after throwing quite the bash for her now 5 year old. Seems my low fuss side is in conflict with my crafty-partygirl side.)

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By: janelle http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300789 janelle Mon, 10 Oct 2011 17:30:07 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300789 I was just in Ireland last month and we were walking down the street and it must have been near the time local schools were dismissed because hundreds of kids in uniforms were just hanging out in the business district. I saw some kids who were probably in the age range of 13, maybe 14, smoking and just hanging out in front of a store. No effort to hide it at all. I think that was the most shocking aspect. If I had seen them down an alley or something, I would have thought they were being sneaky, but this was just another day for them. It totally threw me for a loop.

Now granted, I would say that this was a little group of kids, most others weren’t hanging around smoking, so I’m not saying all teenagers in Ireland do this, but it didn’t seem like it was as scandalous as it would be here in the States.

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By: Tinne from Tantrums and Tomatoes http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300747 Tinne from Tantrums and Tomatoes Mon, 10 Oct 2011 11:51:30 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300747 Yeah Eastpack!

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By: Saule http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300732 Saule Sun, 09 Oct 2011 17:26:51 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300732 I would love to hear more about the low fuss birthdays. Stateside, birthday parties seem over the top and to no benefit of the birthday kids. If you have any introverts in the family (I do!) they are overwhelming! Thanks for sharing!

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By: Aryn http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300726 Aryn Sun, 09 Oct 2011 09:45:33 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300726 I love these posts! I haven’t enrolled my little expat in school yet (although, in Germany, at only 18 months she’s been old enough for a couple of months), but I look forward to buying her first Schultüte (first day of school gift) next year!

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By: My Traveling Troop http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300718 My Traveling Troop Sat, 08 Oct 2011 23:21:56 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300718 I love how the kids greet each other in school there. It sounds so darling and grown up at the same time!

How wonderful that your kiddos are learning French, and some of them are adding a third language to the mix! I hope to introduce a second language to my kiddo while she is young. Knowing a second language is such a gift!

Cheers,
Kristina

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By: dawne http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300714 dawne Sat, 08 Oct 2011 19:34:23 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300714 How I love to read about your children at a French school, learning to speak French, and learning such Good Manners! What brave, cool kids!!! How I wish I could have done that with our daughter, but then, there’s always the grandson…!

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By: All Unwound http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300711 All Unwound Sat, 08 Oct 2011 15:49:40 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300711 LOVE these updates. It shows how similar but different school experiences in different countries can be. As far as school lunches go I read {in my local newspaper in the US} that the French schools don’t allow children to bring food from home, they must eat school lunches or leave campus and go home for lunch. The article also said that ketchup is going to be limited in French school lunches to once a week. It’s considered a disgustingly UN-French condiment. LOL

So what do your children think of the school lunches?

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By: armcandyforyou http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300702 armcandyforyou Sat, 08 Oct 2011 09:44:21 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300702 In India too………kids stand up & wish every time a teacher or adult enters the class:)

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By: Geevz http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300700 Geevz Sat, 08 Oct 2011 04:26:04 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300700 I love these. Adore them. It makes me want to go and try teaching in France.

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By: Gayletrini http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300695 Gayletrini Sat, 08 Oct 2011 01:58:19 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300695 What a great experience you have given your children! Awesome.
I wish my children could not do homework for a year I am so jealous LOL. Seriously homework is killing me over here and is seriously making me out as the evil parent. sigh.
Have a great weekend.

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By: Katherine http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300694 Katherine Sat, 08 Oct 2011 01:45:13 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300694 Dearest G,
So glad to hear that the kids have found their groove. Admittedly, when you embarked on this adventure, I was sceptical – knowing how to most non-French, the French school system may appear rigidly traditional and unforgiving. Well done to you all! I am most happiest that you guys have picked up on the positives rather than get mired in the negatives. As in life, pros and cons exist in everything.

To the earlier poster who asked about maths – from our experience, the French place a heavy emphasis on mental arithmetic – so from age 7 and even up to now for my son who is 10, they are drilled to do mental maths quickly. The idea is that once they have a solid fluent base, they will have the confidence and facility to handle the more complex math operations.
The French have a heavy cultural bias towards maths and the science subjects. The cream of graduates who land the best jobs often come from the leading engineering schools like Ecole Polytechnic. So much so that at high school, kids are often pushed to select the science stream for their baccalaureat bec. the bias is that the “smart” kids do “terminal S”. The downside is that it’s not a great system if your kids are not academic.

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By: Sarah Bradley http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300691 Sarah Bradley Sat, 08 Oct 2011 00:11:06 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300691 It seems like it’s much more formal in France than here in the US. I like it. I really appreciate the manners that are taught over seas and wish we’d get back to the basics here in the US.

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By: Colleen http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300689 Colleen Fri, 07 Oct 2011 23:22:50 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300689 As a retired teacher, I appreciate your reporting and the matter-of-fact-way you handle the school situation of your kids. I find it most refreshing. This allows each of them to own their own pieces of their school and at the same time, feel the love and support of their caring parents. Keep sharing as we all feel a little like we are there too.

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By: Angela Noelle http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300684 Angela Noelle Fri, 07 Oct 2011 21:12:29 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300684 These posts are incredible. Thank you for sharing them! And I’m in agreement with many others, simple birthday parties have their own magic, and keep the relationships central to the day rather than all the fluff.

In New Zealand, school is different from both the U.S. and France (and the other countries desribed)…but more like the U.S. than Europe, it seems.

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By: jillian http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300682 jillian Fri, 07 Oct 2011 20:41:32 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300682 I think learning French is the best thing for your kids. We are a bilingual family (English and Dutch) living in Italy. Our kids use 4 languages on a daily basis (English, Dutch, Italian and French). They tend to mix them up a little but overall it has become such a normal thing for them that they don’t even notice it. They’ll all be fluent before you know it…

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By: Kelly http://www.designmom.com/2011/10/school-report/comment-page-1/#comment-300680 Kelly Fri, 07 Oct 2011 20:23:13 +0000 http://www.designmom.com/?p=13915#comment-300680 Gosh, it all sounds so wonderfully civilized and calm. I love all the physical touching between the kids — my son is in 1st grade, and still wanted to hug his friends good-bye after play dates, but they all sort of shove him off — and the mom’s would back them up: “we’re too old for hugging now,” etc. Well remember,…they’re only 5 and 6! And what would happen if he actually tried to kiss anyone? Kind of sad, how we need to demonstrate how “macho” our boys are, when they’re still so young and naturally affectionate.

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